Astrological Objects

There are some objects that are considered in astrology, despite explicitly not physically existing. In some cases, astrologers even agree that they do not exist, and yet these objects sometimes appear in charts and ephemera nonetheless. I suppose I shouldn't think of this as too scandalous — astrology has no effect on reality, after all, so why should reality have any effect on astrology. In any case, here are some of the symbols for those objects.

Admetos

Not to be confused with 85030 Admetos.

This is a trans-Plutonian planet that is considered in the Hamburg School of Astronomy.

Apollon

Not to be confused with 1862 Apollo.

This is a trans-Plutonian planet that is considered in the Hamburg School of Astronomy.

Cupido

Not to be confused with 763 Cupido.

This is a trans-Plutonian planet that is considered in the Hamburg School of Astronomy.

Hades

This is a trans-Plutonian planet that is considered in the Hamburg School of Astronomy.

Kronos

This is a trans-Plutonian planet that is considered in the Hamburg School of Astronomy.

Lilith

Not to be confused with 1181 Lilith, or the debunked moon Lilith.

Also known in astrology as Black Moon Lilith [1]. This point corresponds to the second empty focus of the Moon's orbit around the Earth. Due to the mean precession of the major axis of the Moon, this point circles the Earth about every 8.85 years. The symbol for this astrological object is a black-filled crescent moon on a female cross, which exists in Unicode as ⚸, U+26B8.

For the astrologers who double as astronomy nerds, there is a "true" version of this object, which takes into account higher-order perturbations on the Moon's orbit by the Sun and planets. The symbol for this True Black Moon Lilith, as used in some astrology software, is a black-filled version of the symbol of 2 Pallas.

Poseidon

Not to be confused with 4341 Poseidon.

This is a trans-Plutonian planet that is considered in the Hamburg School of Astronomy.

Proserpina

This is a trans-Plutonian planet that is considered in the Hamburg School of Astronomy.

Selena

Not to be confused with 1181 Lilith.

Also known in astrology as White Moon Selena [1]. This point travels in a way that opposed the astrological object Black Moon Lilith. Due to the mean precession of the major axis of the Moon, this point circles the Earth about every 8.85 years. The symbol for this astrological object is an unfilled crescent moon on a female cross.

For the astrologers who double as astronomy nerds, there is a "true" version of this object, which takes into account higher-order perturbations on the Moon's orbit by the Sun and planets. The symbol for True White Moon Selena, or True Light Moon Arta, as used in some astrology software, is a crescent moon rotated so the points are upward, on a female cross.

Transpluto

This is a fictional planet used in astrology [1]. It was predicted by astronomer Francis M.E. Sevin, during a time when many distant planets were being imagined. It's name comes from it's supposed orbital path being peyond Pluto. Although claims of observations of this planet have never been made, ephemerides for it exist in some astrological texts. This particular planet has also gone by the names Bacchus, [[[minor-planets:399 |Persephone, and Isis, each of which is of course already the name of a real asteroid.

There exists a common symbol for this astrological planet: a circle with an upward arc inscribed in the upper half of it, with an up arrow. The creator of this symbol is not known.

Vulcanus

Not to be confused with the debunked planet Vulcan, or 4464 Vulcanus.

This is a trans-Plutonian planet that is considered in the Hamburg School of Astronomy.

Zeus

Not to be confused with 5731 Zeus.

This is a trans-Plutonian planet that is considered in the Hamburg School of Astronomy.

[1] "Additional Symbols for Astrology, Revised," David Faulks, https://www.unicode.org/L2/L2016/16080r-add-astrology.pdf

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